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Archive for the ‘Weekend Cooking’ Category

Long Island Ice Tea – variant

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Our summer high cocktail has evolved, so as it reflects the qualities of the alcohol we we like best. The basic recipe (for 3 people, evening), in order of importance:

  • 3 jiggers of smoky Leyenda Tlacuache Organic Mezcal (Tequila)
    • This “tequilla” is noted for its smoky flavour and fits well into our palate that enjoys a good Scotch. See picture below.
  • 2.5 jiggers of Gin – recommend Star of Bombay London Dry Gin
    • There are many Gins out there, but we (I) believe this Gin’s structure, with some emphasis on citrus, is the proper compliment.
  • 2.5 maximum jiggers of Cointreau.
    • I will use 2 to 2.5 jiggers, the larger quantity if I want a more of an orange hit, but more frequently, I use just 2 jiggers.
    • Triple Sec is the common call out, but I prefer the orange structure of Cointreau.
  • 2 jiggers of Bacardi White Rum.
    • Of the many fine rums, there are, I find this works best with the Mezcal.
  • 2 jiggers of Grey Goose Vodka, alternative is Absolut
    • Vodka has subtle tones, but Vodka does have tones ! Acknowledging this, I find the french Grey Goose made from wheat, compliments the previous ingredients
  • 2 jigger of homemade basic syrup
  • Fresh squeeze Orange Juice to taste (0.5-1.5 jiggers)
    • Traditional receipes call for lemon, but I prefer an Orange Tea.
  • 3 jiggers maximum of Cola, more often just 2.
    • I prefer to use a Cola syrup (from 3/4 out of Montreal), and as cola can dominant, I recommend being conservative when you add it.

Reflecting these proportions, once you have mixed the cocktail, you have:

  • 15+ jiggers (24+ ounces) of cocktail to serve, with a punch of ~12 jiggers (18+ ounces) of alcohol. As it is smooth, it is easy too over consume, so please be careful and drink it slowly at the end of the day, from your patio, watching the sun set.

The mixing instructions and instructions:

  • In the morning mix all alcohol and syrup together, and then refrigerate. We keep it in a cleaned reused Monkey Shoulder bottle.
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  • Just before serving, add Orange and Cola.
    .
  • Serve in double insulated small cocktail glasses full of ice. Enjoy sitting on your deck chair, at the end of a fine day.
Image for Leyenda Tlacuache Organic Mezcal from LCBO

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ūüôā

Written by raspberryfisher

2020/07/19 at 21:57

Posted in Weekend Cooking

Minestrone Soup

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milestrone 2-1

Ingredients

  • Bacon – six+ strips, thinly cross-cut
  • Onion, one, diced
  • Olive Oil,
  • Rosemary, fresh, 10 cm (4″) long
  • Parsley, fresh 1/4 cup with no stems and lightly shredded
  • Basil, fresh 1/4 cup, lightly shredded
  • Garlic, 2 Cloves smashed , then diced
  • Green Cabbage, 1/2 thinly sliced
  • Swiss Chard, chopped
  • Chicken or Vegetable Stock, 6-10 cups
  • Carrot, thinly sliced
  • Tomato, can of diced Tomato, if not fresh
  • Pinto Beans, can and washed
  • Orzo, 3/4 cup

Steps

  1. In a large dutch oven, under medium heat cook the bacon to release its oil
  2. Add in Onions to soften and adsorb the bacon oil and then reduce to medium-low
  3. If necessary, add olive oil (I usually do). Put on the lid.
  4. Patience: let the onion soften, so they “merge” with the bacon.
    1. For me, this is often 10-20 minutes.
    2. Watch over, add oil if necessary and stir once or twice.
  5. Layer in herbs and garlic.
  6. Patience again, let time and medium low heat do its magic.
  7. Lift out most of the solids, but ensure the base of the pot has the well flavoured oil.
  8. Lay down the cabbage onto the oiled pot bottom.
  9.  Lay on top, the Swiss Chard.
  10. Add the onion herb solids on top. Place lid back on.
  11. Patience again, under medium low heat sweat the cabbage,
    1. For me, this is often 20 minutes
    2. Watch over, and occasionally mix.
  12. Patience again.
  13. Add in stock, tomato and beans.
    1. The orzo will adsorb a lot of stock later, so do not be afraid to use a lot of stock.
  14. Raise the heat to medium, keep pot lid on.
  15. As soup is getting close to boil, reduce heat to medium.
  16. As soup is in boil, reduce heat to low and maintain a simmer.
  17. Simmer for 30 minutes.
  18. Check if you want to add salt.
    1. If you do add salt, wait another 5 minutes after you have add the salt, before you go to the next step.
  19. Add in Orzo and ensure the pot is still at simmer 5 minutes after.
  20. Ready after 10 minutes in a simmering pot.Good for 2 days.

Last: This website is meant to be a non-commercial site, providing a record of “things”, I or others close to me may want to come back to. Sadly, if you search for this blog via Google, many commercial sites will be pushed in front.

Google’s “Did you mean” can also interfere.

Currently, the best way to do a targeted search within this blog is to add in the phrases

site:wordpress.com raspberryfisher

for example, toy find this recipe near the top of Google’s search:

site:wordpress.com raspberryfisher minestrone soup

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Written by raspberryfisher

2020/04/22 at 00:38

Posted in Weekend Cooking

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Cullen Skink – wilson’s variant

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A nice cold weather soup.

cullen-1

Apologize for the informal measurements, but I think this is a chowder to make to your desire, and what is available and the strength of the smoked herring (kippers).

  • Under low heat, saute finely diced onion in butter – 4-6 Tbsp – for 10+ minutes in a dutch oven.
    .
  • Add milk – 1.2 l and
  • Add potatoes – 1.2 kg
  • and bring to simmer until potatoes are soft
  • under a low heat, with cover on.
    .
  • Monitor and ensure you are not burning the milk.
    .
  • Rough mash and add salt.
    .
  • Add in kippers – smoked herring – 2-4 fillets
  • Add in salmon – 2-4 fillets
  • Add in 1/3 cup of your favourite cooking scotch
    • For me, this is McClellands Islay, smoky but not too acidic.
    • Our favorite drinking scotch is a blend – Monkey Shoulder – but this is kept for just sipping.
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  • When fish is cook, add cream – 2/3 Cup.
  • Keep on low heat, but once soup is warm – 180F – it is ready too serve.
    .
    Serve with a toasted baquette.

What you have is blend of a chowder and potato soup.
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Written by raspberryfisher

2020/03/02 at 03:28

Posted in Weekend Cooking

Old Fashion Cheesecake – Bourbon & Bitters

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cheesecake-1
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When you think of an Old Fashion Cheesecake or “Google” it, you will probably not come across a cheesecake fashion after the cocktail, the Old Fashion.

This recipe reflects my experimentation and efforts, and here is my brief summary.  I apologize for some brevity.  As I have been making cheesecakes for nearly 40 years now, some steps are quickly describe.

The crust in a 9″ Spring-form Pan

  • 2 Cups Graham crushed crackers
  • ~4 Tbsp of melted butter
  • 1 Fresh Orange (will also be used for the batter and glaze)
    .
  • Use microplane to create a fine zest from the one Orange.
  • Mix well the graham cracker crumbs with the fine zest.
    • Try to avoid any “clumping”, but mixing well.
  • Dampen with melted butter.¬† The less butter you use, the better.
  • Press into the pan.
    .
  • Do not use sugar.
    .
  • Let the pan sit on the counter.

The batter

  • 1.5 lbs of Cream Cheese¬† – at room temperature
    • For me, this is 3 blocks of Philadelphia Cream Cheese
  • 2/3 c of Confectioner’s Sugar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1/3 Cup of your strongest favourite bourbon
    • Our household favourite is Woodford Reserve Distillers Select, but I will also use a small batch from Knob Creek or Elisa Craig.
  • 1 Tbsp of Orange juice, from a real fresh Orange.
  • 2 Dashes of Bitters. My default is Angostura
  • 4 Tbps of melted Butter
  • 3/4 Cups of Heavy Sour Cream
    .
    This will yield a moist cake, and we find the bitters intensifies and the bourbon softens, when it bakes.
    .
  • Preheat the Oven at 350F
  • Beat cheese and sugar together.
  • Beat in one egg at a time, until all 4 eggs are in.
    .
  • Lightly mix bourbon, orange juice and bitters in a separate bowl.
    .
  • Add bourbon-juice-bitters and butter mix to the batter and blend well.
  • Gently blend in sour cream.
    .
  • Pour into the Pan
  • Bake for 45 minutes
  • At 45 minutes, turn off the oven and cool in the oven.
  • Let the cheesecake to room temperature, and then chill in the “fridge”.

The glaze

  • 1 Can of Mandarin Orange Segments in Syrup
    • Keep 1/2c of the syrup
    • Optional keep orange segment
  • 1 Tbsp of refined Sugar
  • 1 Tbsp of Cornstarch
  • 1 tsp of Butter
  • 1 tsp of Lemon Juice, I strongly prefer a fresh Meyer Lemon
  • 1 tsp of Bourbon
    .
  • Drain the oranges and keep 1/2 cup of syrup
  • If desired, artfully arrange whole segments on the cheesecake top.
    .
  • In small saucepan, dry mix sugar and cornstarch.
  • Add syrup into the saucepan under medium heat.
  • Stir until the liquid comes to a rapid boil.
  • Reduce heat to medium and continue with a “smooth” stir for 3 minutes, while the glaze boils.
  • Turn off heat.
    .
  • Add butter.
  • Add juice and bourbon.
  • Stir until butter has melted and thoroughly mixed.
    .
  • Let the glaze cool, but before it sets, pour over the cheesecake.
  • Place in fridge.
    .
  • Ready to eat in 4 hours.
    .cheesecake-1

 

Written by raspberryfisher

2020/03/02 at 02:15

Posted in Weekend Cooking

la venaison bourguignon aka road-kill stew

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As this¬†is an adaption of Boeuf Bourguignon, I have used the French spelling for venison, id est¬†“venaison”.

Deer (here) are an abundant wild animal.¬† This fall, we pulled a deer out of our pool. Recently, within 10′ from the house, a few dogs-wolves bloodied a deer (from a small herd). We follow the blood trail in the snow for a few hundred, but the spotting became infrequent, and we did not find the deer.

As they will eat my hosta and tulips at our bedroom window as we sleep, strip my day-lilies and raspberries; plus as we have hit 3 deer (with the car),  I relish the opportunity to have local venison.

The frequency of deer collisions in my rural area is high, so quietly a set of rules has been established when helping your neightbours, when you come across a car that has hit the deer, the fundamental Qs to cover ….

  1. You confirm the driver and anybody nearby is ok.
  2. You ask if they need help – tow, other, et cetera
  3. “Do you plan to keep the deer?” If the deer is still alive and too injured to survive, kill (ASAP) it humanely. Death happens to all, but death should be dispatch with consideration for the soul, ours and theirs.

This is not you traditional recipe, but to reflect the enjoyment and consideration for eating local.

Ingredients and Steps

  • Red Wine – 1 Bottle > Get a nice bodied read wine out of the cellar. Open it, and have a glass.¬† If you need to buy, buy local if you can. For me, this could be a Quinte House Red Wine.
    .
  • Strips of real Smoked Bacon – 12 strips – cross-cut into 4mm strips > My local favourite is Seed to Sausage in Sharbot Lake, On.
    .
    Please note the emphasis of real bacon.
    .
    As food producers focus on increasing profitability-lowering cost, the quality of bacon has substantially deteriorate as it is replaced with pork injected with phosphate, nitrate, and liquid smoke. Our old standby of Schneider’s is a chemical infuse product now, and my replacement Dutch Bacon has also trasition to a chemically infuse with pork as a by-product
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  • Clean prepared Venison, 2lbs preferably from my yard.
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  • Sweet Onion (1) or equivalent from our local farmer community.
    .
    I find with a very sharp knife, the onion will bruise less, and quite happy to use a large field onion, as the alternative to a sweet onion. Yes, I am articulating a case, your knives can affect your food.
    .
  • Carrots (2) from our local farmer community.
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  • Flour, there is a limited supply of Artisan flour here, but I will pull out of my stores of global common white flour.
    .
    The flour is to make the roux, so which ever flour you use (I have also done well with spelt), it must be a flour you feel good in making a gravy.  A deceased friend use to get his from Upper Canada Village in Brockville, from the old stones.
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  • Walnut Oil (or Olive, if there is a nut allergy) – keep on hand.
    ,
  • 1/4 c local Gin, with Juniper (redundant, as all Gin should have Juniper). With the explosion of local breweries¬†and distilleries is a boon to the consumer. I suspect we seen the needle wing too far and there is an “over-supply”, and possible a contraction of suppliers is likely to happen, but the choice available to us is a good thing,
    .
    I am currently using Georgian Bay Gin.
    .
    The traditional french version call for cognac. As a sister plant to Juniper is Cedar, I find it fitting to use Gin for a local deer. .
    .
  • Mushroom and-or Vegetable¬†Stock, up to 3c
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  • Tomato Paste, 1 tsp – here I break down and get a cans of Hunts, this reflects my grandmother’s insistence to use Hunts when making cabbage rolls.
    .
  • Garlic, 4 large gloves. get local or from the Ottawa Valley!
    .
    The general supply of garlic is a shameful story of corporate greed from the Canadian food retailers, who buys low quality garlic in bulk from China (there are claims of dumping to, plus poor labour practice to). The Canadian corporate argument is that they can ensure the garlic they offer on the Pacific Coast is the same as on the Atlantic coast, is the same, even if it  some of the worst Рworthless Рtasteless Рgarlic possible.
    .
    Fresh garlic from my area – Ottawa Valley – is a treasure. I have also tasted great local garlic in Italy, Yorkshire, so I know others are also blessed with this great condiment.
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  • Butter, 3 tsp, I am happy that our milk and dairy industry is protected from the US, for we do get quality milk and butter,
    .
    Conversely, we do need to continue opening the cheese market. The dairy industry got lazy and rested on producing mediocre cheese. Good cheese – aka from France, UK, Germany, Spain, et cetera – was limited and control by these boards, sadly protecting an inferior Canadian product.
    .
    Good news, local artisan cheese producers now have access to customers, and we are seeing good products at the small shops.  The Canadian diary industry needs to take heed, you can own the market, if you provide good product, but if you are providing only rubber orange dyed cedar cheese, you deserve to loss the market. Control comes with responsibility for safety and quality. Do not expect loyalty, if you deliver poor product.
    .
  • Mushrooms, 1 cup minimum.¬† Wild mushrooms can work, or small brown mushrooms that have been quartered.
    .
  • Soft Apple, like a MacIntosh or Cortland chopped (option).
    .
    Applies represent another case of corporate greed, where the majority of the stock is flown in from New Zealand and South America – Crisp, Fujis, Pink Ladies, when GREAT apples are grown within 100km of where I live – Cortland, Macintosh, et cetera.
    .
  • White Potatoes – preferably small – cut into 3/8″ cubes

So above, I made a passionate plea, experiment with local produce, and do not let the greed/control of large corporations whose actions do not reflect quality produce first.  .
.

They can provide good produce, but they are willing to throw quality under the bus to improve on their margins.

The steps

  1. Turn on the Oven to 350F.
    .
  2. In Dutch Oven, brown the bacon and remove, leaving dripping begin,. (This is why a quality bacon is important, it is your base!).
  3. Brown the Venison  and remove.
  4. Add the chopped carrots and onions. Sauté until the onions are tender and begun to brown.
  5. Transfer the onions and carrots to a bowl, and add the apple.
  6. Add flour and make the roux. If you need more oil, add walnut (olive) oil.
  7. As roux is being made and has reached a medium brown, stir in onions and carrots.  At the completion, the onions and roux should be well coated.
  8. Add the Gin, and you may flambé Рif it is safe to do so.
  9. Under medium low heat, add remaining wine, tomato paste, garlic, meat, bacon.
  10. Cover with stock, but do not flood it – just enough stock to cover the stew.
  11. Transfer to Oven (with lid on), typically 2-3 hours,
    .
    Bake until meat is tender. My pots (Dutch Ovens (Staub)) do a fantastic job on maintaining moisture, but if you are losing to much, add stock and consider a secondary parchment barrier, laying on top of the stew.
    .
  12. Under low heat in a secondary pan, sauté the mushrooms in butter.
    .
  13. When stew is ready, combine with mushrooms and let sit for 10 minutes.
    .
  14. Serve.
  15. Great meal for 2 days.

deer stew_DSC4529

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Update March 1 2020, but also let me note, in this posting, I have expressed some critical views of corporation sacrificing food quality for profits. I still adhere to this, as I see grocery stores change hands, vegetable quality change, et cetera, but I like to note not all “chains are bad”.

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Written by raspberryfisher

2018/12/28 at 03:58

Butternut Squash Soups

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butternut soupButternut Squash with Ginger

Ingredients:

  1. 1 Large Butternut Squash
  2. 2-3 Large Leeks
  3. 4 tsps of shredded fresh ginger
  4. 4-6c of Chicken Stock

Steps the Night Before:

  1. Night before bake the squash – cut in half, oil the cut side and place on baking sheet.
  2. Bake for an hour (tender) at 400F, then cool.
    .
  3. If you want to keep the soup “bright”, bake it light and lower temperature, so as to not to brown the cut side.¬† Myself, I like the associated flavor add that is associated with the slight browning of the edges.

Next day:

  1. Melt at medium-low, 1/4c butter.
  2. Chop white part of leek and put in pot..
  3. Add in ginger.
  4. Cook until tender.
    .
  5. Scoop pulp out of squash.
  6. Add into pot, mixing with leeks.
    .
  7. Add in 4c Chicken Stock to suit.
  8. Reduce heat, simmer for 25 minutes with pot covered.
  9. Puree.
    .
  10. Adjust taste and texture to suite with stock, stock and pepper.
    .

Does not make a large pot of soup, but it is nice to have on a fall day.

Squash with Apple Soup

Ingredients:

  1. 1 Large Butternut Squash (or any winter squash)
  2. 2-3 Large Leeks
  3. 2 Cooking Apples, such as  Cortland
  4. 4-6c of Chicken Stock
  5. 1 tsp of garam masala.
  6. 1/2c Table Cream

Next day

  1. Peel, seed and cube squash into 15mm “bits”
    .
  2. Melt at medium-low, 1/4c butter.
  3. Chop white part of leek and put in pot.
  4. Add in Apple.
  5. Add in spice.
    1. I have also used cumin and cloves or fresh rosemary, but with the apple and cream, I prefer a combination that more reflects a curry. Thus consider, your preferences for curry, garam masala, cumin and cloves.
  6. Cook until tender.
    .
  7. Put Squash in.
  8. Add into pot, mixing with leeks.
  9. Let flavours mix (10 minutes),
    .
  10. Add in Chicken Stock, minimum 4c.
  11. Reduce heat and simmer for 25 minutes with lid on.
    .
  12. Puree.
  13. Add in cream.

the Pot and other notes

  1. Unsalted butter is a table of the larder, and it is always available, and for this reason, I often do not listed in the ingredients.
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  2. Salt – Maldon Salt Flakes. I have migrated from Northern France Sea Salt to Maldon Flake Salt, as I find is structure does absurd better into the food.
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  3. I am a firm believer that patience with a good cast iron french-dutch oven creates the best soups. If you are looking for a GOOD pot, I recommend to look for a pot where the lid is dimple on the underside to allow water to drip back into the pot. There are other considerations, size and items hard to assess in the store (heat distribution), but look to the old brands that have taken the century to perfect their product.  I am very fond of my Staub (much easier to find now, as Henckel now sells and promotes these pots).
    .
    I have two smaller French Made Pots with an amazing enamel interior.  I bought these pots many many moons ago for Nabeyaki Udon, but there is no manufacturers name or mark. My searches would indicate the manufacturer-design is no longer with us, otherwise I would buy more and rave about them.
    .

 

Written by raspberryfisher

2017/11/12 at 18:39

Posted in Weekend Cooking

Chicken Curry Soup

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chicken curry IMG_8952

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An adaption of a Mulligatawny Soup.

The night before barbecue the chicken and 1-2 onion(s).

The ingredients

  • Butter
  • 2-3 Medium Onions
  • 1 tbsp of Curry Power
  • 1/4 tsp of Garam Masala
  • 4-5 Medium Apples, like Cortland or Sweetango
  • 4-6 cups of Chicken Stock
  • 2-3 cups of cubed Chicken Thighs-Legs
  • 2 carrots, diced – optional
  • 1/2c Table Cream, 18%
  • Green Tabasco

Steps and Notes

Curry and Garam Masala: Curries and Masalas are “mixes of spice”. As most Canadian curries blend to a sweeter side, I like using a blend of a generic curry and a little hot Garam Masala.¬†If at the end of the day, you want a little more “heat”, add some Green Tabasco into your bowl.

Barbecue: Barbecuing transforms vegetabes and meat with its intensity of heat and flaring of oils. So the night before:

  • Cook 1-2 onions, cut in half, softening it and allow some grill marks come out.
  • Cut the dark meat chicken with skin and bones on. I do about 3 minutes on high (oils will flare), then move the chicken in a basket for 3 minutes on medium and then let it cook for 6 minutes on low in the cool corner.

Apples: I prefer cooking apples, such as Cortlands, versus the hard eating Delicious or Granny Smiths, for the juices that release during cooking and how they soften under heat. Some apples, such as “macs” can break down too much, but this is your choice as a cook.

Dutch Oven: Nothing better than a good dutch oven, such as a Staub, when used with patience to make a soup.

  1. Night before:
    1. Cook 1-2 Onions on the Barbecue
    2. Cook Chicken with Skin and Bones On.
      .
    3. In the morning dice the onions.
    4. For the chicken, remove skins and bones and then tear-break into some cubes.
      .
  2. In a Pot, combine:
    1. 1/4c Butter or more.
    2. All diced onions.
    3. Curry and Garam Masala
    4. With patiences, soften the onions – 10 minutes+
      .
  3. Combine Applies, with patience, allow apples to blend juices with butter, curry and onions.
    .
  4. Mix in flour.
  5. Add in Chicken Stock.
  6. Under medium to low heat, bring to light boil and allow mixture to thicken.
  7. Patience, write a blog or clean the kitchen.
    .
  8. Add-in Chicen and Carrots.
  9. Lower heat and simmer for 20+ minutes.
  10. Add stock and-or salt to taste.
  11. Add in cream and let the soup heat for 5 minutes.
    .
  12. It is ready and its flavours will improve over the next 2 days.

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Serve with a Baguette or other similar bread.

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Written by raspberryfisher

2017/11/05 at 20:33

Posted in Weekend Cooking

Barley Soup with Sausage

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soup_DSC0241

A cool weather favourite.

  • 3-5 Savory firm sausages, sliced thinly
  • 16c of Chicken Stock
  • 1.25c of Pearl Barley
  • 2 Bay Leaves
  • Olive Oil
  • 2/3 head of Cabbage, sliced in thin ribbons
  • 2 Fresh Carrots, thinly sliced
  • 1 Onion, finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp fresh Parsley, crushed
  • 2 sprigs of Rosemary
  • 3 tbsp, marojam leaves, crushed
  • 1 garlic clove minced
  • 6-16 small white and-or red new potatoes, quartered
  • salt

Steps

  1. Pot 1 РCombine Sausages, Barley, Bay Leaves and Stock.
    1. You can pre-grill the sausages.
  2. Bring Pot 1 to light boil and then lower heat to simmer.
  3. Simmer for 30 minutes.
    .
  4. Pot 2 – Dutch Oven – grill with Olive Oil to soften Cabbage, but do not burn.
  5. After 10-20 minutes, add in Onion,  Carrots, Parsley, and Rosemary
  6. Continue cooking until Cabbage and Onions until they have sweeten.
  7. Longer cooking the better, as long as the Cabbage and Onion is not burnt. Brown is okay, so occasionally stir with a wooden spatula, but otherwise keep pot lid on.
    .
  8. Add in Potatoes, Garlic and Marjoram.
  9. Given vegetables 5 minutes together.
    .
  10. Mix in Pot 1 (Stock, Barley, Sausage) into the Dutch Oven.
  11. Bring to light boil and cook until Potatoes are cooked (not mushy).
    .
  12. As always, use Salt and a light hand with Green Tabasco to season to taste.

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Written by raspberryfisher

2017/06/15 at 00:48

Posted in Weekend Cooking

Short Rib Ragu

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Judy got the new oven and last weekend, we installed it.  So my first test was small, roasted garlic, but 2 nights ago, I made a Short-Rib Ragu.

ragu 3.jpg

Sorry, I had no fettuccine in the pantry, so I resorted to penne.

Yes, this is Ragu in the northern Italian tradition, versus what we get in the North American stores – vegetable base with little to no meat.

Ingredients

  • 3-4 lb Short Ribs (English Cut)
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 3 oz Pancetta, thick slice
  • 1 Onion, Chopped
  • 1 Carrot, Chopped
  • 2c Mushrooms Sliced
  • 3 Garlic Cloves, Large
  • 2 Tbsp Tomato Paste
  • 1 tsp Green Tabasco
  • 1/2c Vermouth
  • 1 28oz Can of Whole Peeled Tomatos

Recipe

  1. Add olive oil to dutch oven-pot
  2. Heat pot on stove to medium
  3. Cut off exterior fat off ribs
  4. Brown ribs as individual ribs (and remove)
  5. After browning is complete and ribs removed, reduce heat
  6. Add pancetta and onion, stir and ensure onions are well oiled
  7. Add onions soften, mushroom and garlic
  8. Cook for 15-30 minutes, occasionally mixing
  9. Add tomato paste and tabasco.
  10. Turn to medium-high
  11. Add wine (vermouth)
  12. Remove any bits off bottom
  13. Add tomatoes
  14. Bring to simmer
  15. Remove off stove
  16. Add in meat and juices
  17. If necessary, add stock to cover ribs
  18. Add a parchment, such that it is just above the ragu
  19. Bake in Oven at 275F
  20. Turn every 45 minutes
  21.  Add stock to cover ribs, if necessary
  22.  Skim fat, if necessary
  23. Cook until meat falls off bones (typically 3+ hrs)
  24. Remove from oven, set aside for 15+ minutes
  25. Remove meat and set aside
  26.  If necessary, use wood spoon to break up tomoatoes
  27. If serving that day, keep sauce warm on stove
  28. When meat is cool enough to handle,
    1.  Remove meat from bones
    2. Dispose of any fat
    3.  Break into bite size chunks
  29. Return meat to pot

Good for 3 days and may be frozen for future pasta dishes.  You can make it a sandwich out of it or as Judy prefers, eat it with Mash Potatoes.

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Written by raspberryfisher

2016/12/23 at 23:30

Posted in Weekend Cooking

Cream of Carrot Soup

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Carrot Soup IMG_5162.jpg

I recently tried another variant, but the following soup has subtle complex and complimentary tastes with orange, ginger, curry and cream that it remains my favourite.

Ingredients

  • 5 cups Chicken Stock
  • 1 tbsp Butter
  • 1 Onion, Coarsely Chopped
  • 2 Tbsp Ginger, Minced
  • 1/2 Tsp Curry (free to adjust to taste and the curry you have)
  • 1c Orange Juice
  • 1.5 lbs Carrots, Chopped.
  • 1/2c Cream, Heavy.

Steps

  • At medium to low heat, add butter into 1/4 c stock into your soup pot
  • Melt the butter.
  • Add onion, ginger and curry.
  • Cook until tender, 10+ minutes.
  • Add reminder of stock.
  • Add orange juice.
  • Add carrots.
  • Bring to boil.
  • Simmer for 20 minutes.
  • Puree.
  • Add cream.
  • Good for 3 days.
  • Add Croutons when serving.

There are so many different curries, but pick your favourite or experiment. With the Ginger and Orange, the flavours hint of South-East Asia, but some of the curries from the Madras (or Garam Masalas) can be a good pick to. Just remember, the idea is blending a complex set of flavours and not create a “hot” soup.

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Written by raspberryfisher

2016/12/21 at 22:56

Posted in Weekend Cooking

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